April 2012 Archives

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Once a new conference table is installed, the last thing anyone wants to think about is moving it again. And most conference tables are very rarely moved. But eventually circumstances may require it: a few years down the line you may remodel your office, or relocate to a new office. Follow these steps to protect your conference table when you move it.

Many Hands Make Light Work. Make sure to have adequate staff on hand to move your table. A large glass table top is surprisingly heavy, and a granite table top is even heavier. One slip by a mover straining under too heavy a load, and your table top might end up with a chip or crack and need to be replaced.
This is especially important if your table top has a finish like frosted glass or our "Scratched" glass, as the movers should take care not to leave smudges on the textured surface of the glass. This is hard for them to do if they are carrying too much weight and are using all their energy not to drop the table.

Padded Blankets Are Your Friend. If the conference table will be moved more than a few feet, or will be turned on its side (to go through a doorway or around a corner), use padded blankets to protect the edges. If the top separates from the base and you need to lean the top against a wall while moving the base, lay padded blankets on the floor before setting the top down.

To Disassemble or Not to Disassemble. Did the table require assembly when it was originally installed? If the table is moving just a few feet within the same room, and you have enough people to lift all the pedestals in unison, you can probably get away with moving it in one piece. If the top is separate you should remove it, move the pedestals, and then replace the top. Do not pull or drag a heavy conference table across the floor.
If the table is moving to another room, or is so large you do not have enough people to move all the pedestals at once, you'll have to disassemble the table and reassemble it in its new location. Be sure to save all hardware in plastic bags, and clearly label all parts as you disassemble the table.

Read the Functional Manual. Use the assembly instructions that came with the table (you did save them, didn't you?) to ensure correct disassembly and re-assembly. If you no longer have the assembly instructions, contact the manufacturer for a new set of instructions. Provide them with a copy of your original invoice or packing list so they know exactly what table you need instructions for.

Caveat Emptor. If you are hiring movers/installers to move your conference table, make sure their rates and policies are clearly explained. Will they crate the table, or move it as is? What is their responsibility if the table is damaged while in their hands?

Cold Storage. Due to scheduling conflicts you may need to remove your table from its old location before the new location is ready. If you do not have space where the table can be stored, ask your moving company how much they would charge to store it for you. For long-term storage you may wish to rent a storage unit. Or you might even contact the original manufacturer and ask if they can store it, although this will probably require freight to and from their location.